longitudinal slip velocity


longitudinal slip velocity
the difference between the spin velocity of the driven or braked tire and the spin velocity of the straight free-rolling tire. Both spin velocities are measured at the same linear velocity at the wheel center in the x-direction. A positive value results from driving torque.

Mechanics glossary. 2013.

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